Tadami Line: 5 Sights You Shouldn’t Miss

The Tadami Line is an incredibly scenic railway that runs across Aizu. autumn1

Connecting the bustling samurai city of Aizu Wakamatsu with the serene, gorgeous countryside of Oku Aizu, this route is definitely one to try out if you want a chance to see rural Japan at its best.

Although I have visited this area of Fukushima Prefecture, I’m actually yet to ride on the Tadami Line! So I’m using this blog post as an opportunity to research about the Tadami Line, and to choose some places to visit during my upcoming trip!

tadami1tadami3

The 2 photos above were taken in Tadami, a rural town deep in the heart of Aizu.

The Tadami Line is great because it provides a way for visitors to see areas of this beautiful prefecture basically undiscovered by tourists. Riding the train is a fun experience in itself, as is the fact you can hop off and on at any stations you’re interested in visiting.

summer3

 

While being a passenger on the train means you’ll be provided with fantastic, panoramic views of the historic towns which lie on the Tadami Line, getting off at Aizu Miyashita Station, and catching the bus to Mishima Town’s observation points means you can see the train in action, passing over the stunning Tadami River Bridge.

misty

No matter what the season, the views along the Tadami Line are absolutely breathtaking.

So far, I have gone to visit the area only in spring and summer time, but this year I definitely want to go there in autumn and winter too.

 

4 Seasons of the Tadami Line

 

 

 

Top Sightseeing Spots on the Tadami Line

 

1. Aizu Wakamatsu: Tsuruga-jo Castle

tsuruga-jo-castle-aizu-wakamatsu-aizuwakamatsu-fukushima

Fukushima’s most well known castle. Destroyed at the climax of the Boshin War, this reconstruction of the castle serves as a reminder to the people of Fukushima of their history, and the code of honour that has been at the heart of Aizu samurai society.

tadami-line-aizu-wakamatsu

See more here

 

2. Yanaizu: Historic Enzoji Temple

enzoji

Enzoji is a stunning temple with a legendary history, which has sat majestically on top of a cliff edge for over 1300 years. The temple is where the story of the akabeko – the symbol of Fukushima Prefecture began. A red cow is said to have appeared out of nowhere to assist with the building of the temple when all hope seemed to be lost.

tadami-line-yanaizu

See more here

 

3. Mishima: View Spot

summer1

The famous viewpoint of Tadami Bridge that crosses over Tadami River. This viewpoint is accessible from a stairway that begins outside Mishima Juku Roadside Station (道の駅尾瀬街道三島宿).

tadami-line-mishima

See here for more information on reaching Mishima Juku Roadside Station.

 

4. Kaneyama: Natural Sparkling Water Well

kaneyama

One of the only places in Japan where carbonated water occurs naturally. A teapot attached to the top is provided so that visitors can lower it deep into the well, collect water, fill up their own bottles with it or drink it in the cups provided!

tadami-line-kaneyama

See more here

 

5. Tadami: Beautiful Scenery

tadami

Oku Aizu is definitely the most rural area I’ve been to in Japan. The sight of farmers going about their daily tasks makes you realise that although we get pretty tied up in our fast-paced lives, there is something really special about being surrounded by nature.

tadami-line-tadami

See more here (Change the language to ‘English’ from the pull-down list on the top right)

 

Access

The first stop on the Tadami Line is Aizu Wakamatsu Station, easily accessible from Tokyo or others areas in Fukushima Prefecture. See here for details about reaching Aizu Wakamatsu.

Due to part of the railway line being damaged by the earthquake of 3.11, part of the Tadami Line route has been replaced by a bus service between Aizu Kawaguchi Station and Tadami Station. But the buses leave from outside their respective stations, and the bus drivers announce their arrival clearly – so you don’t have to worry about getting the wrong bus!

 

More Information:

What did you think about this post?

If you liked it, please leave a comment and sign up for email updates here!

sign-up-icon

5 thoughts on “Tadami Line: 5 Sights You Shouldn’t Miss

  1. Zoe, stop posting these great stories, I can’t fit all these great places in to just a few August days in Fukushima. The Tadami Line also was on the ‘top 10’ to do, just doing the whole line in one go to get back to Tokyo from Aizu-Wakamatsu.

    But maybe stopping over in Tadami would be the go, hopping on and off along the way. That Onsen view looks sensational!

    But it looks like I will be coming back in late November for a major Disaster Risk Reduction conference in Sendai. (The early draft conference program includes field trips to Fukushima) Another few days to explore maybe.

    Like

      1. Hi Zoe, sorry I might have already replied to your questions in other posts. I stayed in Fukushima for 3 nights so in my usual way I packed a lot in to those days. I will eventually write up all the adventures.

        Saturday evening, with many thousands of others went to Sukagawa Fireworks Festival. Sunday Azusa-Kofuji and Mt Issaikyo. Monday Morohashi Museum of Art and Goshiki-numb Ponds. Tuesday Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art. All mixed in with wandering around town not quite aimlessly but sans-plan. Oh, and taking in a few adult beverages.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. When I was a high school boy, sometimes I used the Tadami line in order to see my girl friend or to see fire works. Whenever I happen to see the train, it reminds me of younger years. Population of Aizu area is getting low but rivers, mountains, tenderness of locals, and traditions remain the same. Now those things that have not changed seem to be the treasure of the area in my opinion.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s